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The climate of India
India has a very diverse climate, which is caused by its situation and the big differences in geography. Thus India has not less than seven climate zones according to the Koeppen-Geiger climate classification. The west and north-west have areas with a desert climate (type BwH) or a steppe climate (type BSh). The steppe climate also occurs in parts of the south of the country. The mountainous areas in the north and north-east of India have a moderate China climate (Cwb) passing into a high mountain climate in the most elevated areas of the Himalaya mountains. The north and north-east (among others the provinces Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, parts of Madhya Pradesh, Assam, Jharkhand, parts of Chhattisgarh, Punjab, Manipur, Nagaland, Mizoram, Meghalaya and Tripura have a warm China climate alternated with a tropical savannah climate (Aw). Large parts of the south and east have the tropical monsoon climate as well. The west coast however is subject to a tropical monsoon climate (type Am),just like the archipelagoes of Laccadiven (West India) and Andamanen & Nicobaren (east of the mainland of India).

Because of the large differences in types of climate it is very important to consider very well in what season you travel to what place. Traveling to the east of India in the period of May up to and including September surely means getting to do with much rain and a considerable chance of floods and other misery as a consequence of extreme precipitation. Thus Cherrapunji in the province of Meghalaya is even the wettest place but one on earth. The yearly moderate precipitation here is not less than 11.440 millimeter, of which the months June and July with amply 2800 mm. a month are by far the wettest. That is nearly one hundred millimeter a day, which is even more than what falls in Holland per month in the wettest months. The village of Mawsynram, situated nine kilometers farther away, is even wetter; with an average of 11.872 millimeters a year this is officially the wettest place on earth. According to the Guinness Book of Records Mawsynram had to deal with as much as 26000 millimeters of rain in the year 1985, which is by far the largest amount of precipitation ever in one place within one year. The extremely large amount of rainfall, which also the neighboring country of Bangla Desh has to deal with, has a combination of three causes. First of all there is the warm humid wind rolling in from the Gulf of Bengal in northern direction. Second there is the situation of the Khasi mountain range forming a kind of wall, by which the depressions from the Gulf of Bengal are slowed down and larger quantities of rain can fall. Heavy rainfall for days on end during the monsoon period in the summer months is no exception. The third reason is that during the monsoon a lift effect is generated, dragging, as it were, the rain up the hills. The differences in temperature against the mountain-passes causes the vapor in the air easily to be transformed into rain.

 

Climate information of places and areas in India
The climate information on this page is only brief. Specific information about weather and climate can be found on the climate pages per area or town. As for India the following climate information is available:

Agra
Ahmedabad
Amritsar
Anjuna
Arrosim
Baga
Bangalore
Benaulim
Betalbatim
Bogmalo
Calangute
Calcutta
Candolim
Cavelossim
Chennai
Chowara
Colva
Delhi
Goa
Hyderabad
Jaipur
Jodhpur
Kerala
Kochi
Kovalam
Lucknow
Majorda
Mangalore
Miramar
Mobor
Mumbai
Nagpur
New Delhi
Panaji
Poovar
Sinquerim
Srinagar
Surat
Trivandrum
Udaipur
Vainguinim
Varanasi
Varca
Varkala

Four seasons
India roughly counts four seasons. After a rather short winter (January and February) from March the temperature quickly rises through which the climatological summer starts already early in the year. In those months temperatures in the afternoon rise to approximately thirty degrees (coastal areas) to more than forty degrees (inland). Dependent on the area the summer lasts from appr. March up to auding May or June. In India the monsoon period starts in the beginning of June.
It starts every year about June 1st in the south-east and east and then travels in northern/north-westerly direction. Delhi is reached at the end of the month and the north-west has a short monsoon period not starting until the end of July/the beginning of August. The monsoon period lasts up to and including September or locally October, followed by a season with quiet transitional weather to the short winter. In the north the winter starts in November, in the rest of the country not until the course of December. During the wintermonths snow falls in the Himalaya mountains. In the coldest months sometimes night frost occurs in Central India. Due to the low temperatures and the almost complete lack of wind in the northern half of India fog easily arises in the winter season.

Summer
The summermonths are warm and very humid. The last two months before the monsoon the relative air humidity rises to high values. An air humidity of 75 to 95 percent is very normal in many places in India then, which causes the otherwise so tight-blue heaven to get very hazy to even cloudy, without there being any question of depressions entering the country. The chance of thunderstorms also increases strongly and particularly along the coast strong winds can occur, which are the forerunners of the serious oncoming weather change. The only summer month that is still agreeable is March. After March it quickly gets damp and unstable. Inland from April on the heat gets unagreeable through which traveling is rather heavy from this month on.

 

Climate figures
Spread over India you find various climate data and temperatures. The data in the index below go for the coastal places in the federal state of Goa. Visit the individual climate information pages for the climate data in other places of India.

average
 maximum
temperature (įC)

average
minimum

temperature (įC)
average
hours of sunshine

per
day
average days with precipitation
per month
average
mm
precipitation
per month
average
sea
temperature (įC)
January 31 20 10 0 28
February 31 21 10 0 28
March 32 23 9 1 28
April 33 25 10 1 29
May 32 26 9 3 30
June 30 25 5 21 29
July 29 24 4 24 28
August 28 24 4 22 28
September 29 24 6 12 28
October 31 23 8 5 29
November 32 22 9 3 29
December 32 21 10 2 28
= 0-5 mm ● = 6-30 mm ● = 31-60 mm ● = 61-100 mm ● = 101-200 mm ● = over 200 mm
= 0-0.2 inches ● = 0.2-1.2 inches ● = 1.2-2.4 inches ● = 2.5-4 inches ● = 4.1-8 inches ● = over 8 inches

More climate information
Climate figures are very useful but donít present a general impression of the climate and the eventual weather circumstances within a certain period. The figures donít always reflect the chance of wintry weather, extreme heat or hurricanes. That is why we monthly offer useful extra climate information. The information below is an average for the coastal places in the federal state of Goa . Please visit the pages on individual climate information for other places in India.
 

chance of
(very) hot

weather

chance of
(very) cool
weather
chance of
long-term

precipitation
chance of
hurricanes
(cyclones)
chance of
sunny days

UV-index

January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
click here for the explanation of the symbols

 

Disclaimer
The information at this site was carefully composed from climate data collected by meteorological services, meteorological offices, climate experts and other sources. ďMore climate infoĒ is based on statistics, climate data and personal experience. No rights can be derived from this site. Weather has no memory and gives no guaranties. Nothing is as changeable and unpredictable as the weather. The authors of this site feel in no way responsible for any damages caused by misinterpretation or other circumstances that may influence your holiday or trip to a certain destination. We provide information, itís up to the reader to use it to itís benefit.

 

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